Monday, October 11, 2021

Quips and Quotations (Vegetation Variations Edition)

 


I had a rose named after me and I was very flattered. But I was not pleased to read the description in the catalogue: "No good in a bed, but fine against a wall". 

--Eleanor Roosevelt, from a speech given at the White Shrine Club, Fresno, California, early 1960s, quoted in The Event Makers I’ve Known (2012) by Elvin C. Bell, p. 161.



 



14 comments:

  1. That is brilliant! I’d never heard it before. Makes me admire her even more.

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    1. Mitchell, I never heard of it until two days ago, but it's in every web site or web page devoted to Eleanor Roosevelt quotes. But, as you might expect on the internet, without any attributions. It took a bit of detective work on my part to figure out where the quote originated. Normally, I
      don't bother, but its salty nature made me think I should this time.

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  2. I had to work hard to figure out the nonsexual version of that quote.

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    1. Mike, I almost named this post "Deflowered", but I didn't want to step on Eleanor's joke.

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    1. Andrew, from anything I've ever read about Eleanor Roosevelt, she had a very healthy sense of humor. She took her political and social causes very seriously, but not herself.

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  4. Hi, Kirk!

    Happy 137th birthday in heaven (I assume) to former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt. I wrote "I assume" because I won't believe she is gone until you file a report telling me so.

    Who knew Eleanor was a regular Marvelous Mrs. Maisel? If she delivered that zinger in the early 60s as stated in the caption, she must have been ailing and nearing death which occurred in 1962.

    Thanks for remembering Eleanor Roosevelt on her birthday, good buddy Kirk, and have a great week!

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    1. Shady, you forced me to do a bit of research on Eleanor Roosevelt's health (which I didn't really want to do as the whole subject makes me a bit queasy.)

      Eleanor was diagnosed with anemia in 1960, requiring periodic blood transfusions for the rest of her life. Things got particularly bad for her in the summer of 1962, requiring a lengthy hospital stay that only ended when she demanded to go home. About two weeks before she died in November, 1962, it was discovered that she had tuberculosis, and that it had been dormant in her for years, was now activated, and the probable culprit behind the anemia. Sick of doctors and hospitals by this time, she refused treatment, which may have been too late for her by that then anyway.

      However, none of this makes Eleanor an invalid in the last years of her life. In fact, she was, or tried to be, her usual active self during that time. She stumped for John F. Kennedy when he ran for president. After he was elected, JFK appointed her to a second stint as a member of the United Nations delegation. In 1961, she and several others were involved in negotiations (they don't seem to have been successful) with Castro to free prisoners captured during the failed Bay of Pigs invasion. In February of 1962, the year of her death, she visited Europe and Israel.

      That said, Elvin C. Bell, among other things a former assistant to a California state senator, doesn't give any dates for the time he spent escorting Eleanor Roosevelt around Fresno. He describes her as being in her late '70s. Since she turned 76 in 1960, it was ME who decided all this must have taken place in the early 1960s. But she may have been in her early '70s and Bell just thought she was older than she was, in which case the whole thing may have taken place earlier.

      The chapter describing Bell's encounter with Eleanor Roosevelt can be found on Google Books.

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    1. Debra, I've come across a number of show biz anecdotes over the years where some Hollywood celebrity talks about being at a party at "Eleanor Roosevelt's place." She apparently liked to live it up.

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  6. Hello Kirk, I was a little concerned about that "White Shrine Club" but I looked it up and it is a club for people with some connection to a "full Mason." I didn't realize that was such an honor!
    --Jim

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    1. Jim, I guess that's why some Masons are referred to as Shriners.

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  7. OMG....I may have spit some coffee everywhere!

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