Saturday, November 9, 2019

Their Generation


Young English musicians, circa 1962. On the left is Pete Townshend, in the middle is John Entwistle, and on the right is Roger Daltrey. If you recognize those names, then you might also recognize this as the rock band The Who. Except it's not The Who but a precursor to The Who called the Detours. There's no drummer in the above picture, but if there was it would either be Henry Wilson or Doug Sandom. Keith Moon, like the band's change of name, was still a few years way. The Detours didn't turn nearly as much a profit as The Who later did, which meant this also was still a few years way:


After all, that would have been a bit pricey after every gig.

11 comments:

  1. Boring young musicians who don't smash up guitars. I think Daltry was rather nice looking when he was young.

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    1. Andrew, I imagine Daltrey's good looks is one reason he was The Who's front man, despite Townshend being the band's chief songwriter. Of course, that he also had one of the all-time great voices in rock 'n' roll didn't hurt either. Ever see him as the lead character in the 1975 movie Tommy, based on the band's own album of the same name? That deaf, dumb, and blind kid sure played a mean pinball!

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  2. Hi, Kirk!

    I might have told this story before but, in the mid 60s, I played drums in a garage rock cover band. Inspired by the antics of The Who, we destroyed our instruments on stage to impress the audience. However we made the mistake of doing so BEFORE the performance. Did I mention that our band was short-lived?

    I enjoyed seeing this photo of The Detours before they evolved into The Who. If you hadn't identified the members in the text I would have been gazing at them and asking, "Who Are You?" That album and title song, later famously used as the theme of the TV series CSI, were the last the band produced before the death of Keith Moon. It's a shame Moon died at age 32 and never even saw the 1980s.

    Thanks for the memories, good buddy Kirk, and have a super weekend!

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    1. Shady, I almost titled this post "Who Are You?" but was afraid it might give the whole thing away. And you're right about the 1980s. Moon missed out on, among other things, MTV.

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  3. It's amazing how clean-cut and kind of nerdy classic rockers always look in their early years. There's a lot of talent in that photo.

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    2. Mitchell, it's particularly ironic in the case of The Who. Though they're generally considered to have been part of what we in the U.S. call the British Invasion (I don't know what it's called in Britain itself--Operation American Storm perhaps?), because of Townshend's and Moon onstage antics, Daltrey's screaming vocals, Entwistle's loud bass playing, and the use of "fuzzboxes", i.e. distortion techniques (that's about as technical as I'm getting), the band is also seen as having a major influence on punk rock (if so, then maybe the Sex Pistols are overdue for a Super Bowl halftime show.)

      My ears probably aren't musically literate enough to identify it, but I just now looked it up and there IS a musical genre known as "nerd punk", so, going back to what you were saying, Mitchell, maybe The Who influenced that as well.

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  4. I just heard an interview on CBC radio with Pete Townsend about his songwriting skills. Still going strong!

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    1. Debra, Townshend is considered one of rock's more cerebral songwriters, despite the noncerebral destruction of his musical instruments (and even there some have argued he has an intellectual motive for doing so.)

      A few years ago I read Townshend's and Keith Richards' autobiographies back to back, and I have to admit I found Richards' the more entertaining of the two. Richards may be the lesser lyricist (one reason he often leaves those duties to Mick) but his jokey prose style (he had a collaborator so it may have been an as-told-to book) went down better for me than Townshend's dry prose style, which was surprisingly humorless. Of course, his songwriting is often quite funny, and the intellectualism combined with the raucous music is what made The Who stand apart.

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  5. I always wondered how expensive the equipment was when any band smashed it up. Big difference between a smashed $100 guitar or a $10,000 guitar.

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    1. Mike, Townshend once said in an interview that each guitars cost, on average, $150.00.

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