Thursday, December 6, 2018

Quips and Quotations (Podiatry Edition)




 The joke around Hollywood about Garbo was, which is bigger? Her salary or her feet? I saw her in person one time, in New York, and her feet weren't anything extraordinary. Another myth dashed to pieces!


--Jack Benny








 





12 comments:

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    1. Adam, big feet are in the eye of the beholder.

      Speaking for myself, if I examine the top picture closely, then, yeah, her feet are a little large for a woman, but not grotesquely so. If others hadn't pointed it out, I doubt I would have noticed her foot size.

      The Guinness Book of World Records once proclaimed Garbo to be the most beautiful woman who had ever lived. For those who disagree with that assessment (or simply believe such a claim is beyond the scope of measurable science), the big feet allegation is a nice, snarky rebuttal.

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  2. Hi, Kirk!

    If the shoe doesn't fit... you must acquit!

    Greta Garbo is quoted as saying << I never said, "I want to be alone." I only said, "I want to be let alone!" >> However that quote about her quote might have been misquoted. :)

    Do you remember Sylvia Porter - "The Elephant Foot Woman" - a featured attraction at the circus and in carnival side shows (freak shows)? Sylvia and other human oddities were on the midway of the York interstate Fair throughout the 50s and 60s. I vividly recall the barker outside the tent blasting his spiel over the loudspeaker, beckoning customers (suckers) in. "Have you seen Sylvia Porter? She's the girl with the world's largest feet. Her feet are so big, so large, she has never worn shoes in her en-tire life!"

    Enjoy the rest of your week, good buddy Kirk!

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    1. Shady, in Grand Hotel, Garbo's character says this to John Barrymore (Drew's grandpa):

      "I want to be alone. I just want to be alone."

      Though it was never the screenwriter's intent, the line became associated with Garbo herself, rather than the fictional character she played, especially after she dropped out of acting and movies, and spent the rest of her life as a Manhattan recluse.

      Garbo also was quoted in a 1920s interview as saying she wants to be, as you said, let alone. She apparently forgot what she said in the movie when she claimed to be misquoted.

      When it comes to women with big feet, what about My Darling Clementine? She wore "herring boxes without topses"

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  3. So clearly, her salary was bigger, which is as it should be!

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    1. Debra, she earned that salary in any movie I've ever seen her in.

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  4. "I'm tired and nervous and I'm in America. Here you don't know that you live."

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  5. Yet, maddie, she stayed in America, becoming a citizen in 1950.

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  6. Garbo was a size 8 and very narrow. Wherever did that rumor start? As for Clementine, she wore shoes size #9 and even that wasn't so bad. My mother-in-law was a size 11!

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  7. Good question, Mitchell. The rumor started early. By the 1939 caricatures of Garbo with big feet had appeared in both Walt Disney and Warner Brothers cartoons. One possible culprit I've come across is MGM head Louis B. Mayer. Garbo was the studio's biggest star, thus commanding the studio's biggest salary, and was often a particular movie's biggest expense. Her eccentric personality also proved problematic. She refused to sign autographs, answer fan mail, and make herself available to the Hollywood press. So the suspicion has arisen that the big feet slur was simply Metro's attempt to keep her in line. It doesn't seem to have worked in that regard, but the moviegoing public did tire of her after awhile. By the late 1930s she was one of several big names voted by theater owners as "box office poison."

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  8. I alway thought she was beautiful.
    As usual Shady is very clever.

    cheers, parsnip and badger

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    1. It was those cheekbones of hers, parsnip. They almost went up to her eyebrows.

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